REMINDER: Dear Book Bloggers (and others promoting authors) – Guest Post by, Yecheilyah Ysrayl…

REPOST from The Story Reading Ape Blog. Please click the link below for the original post to my latest guest post.

Also, I am actually back from my break so excuse that tidbit. I wrote this a couple months ago.

http://wp.me/p3mGq7-gup

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Shortlinks and Pingbacks

Sometimes you’ll have a post you would like to share on a social platform as limited as Twitter where only 140 characters are allowed. Or, you may want to give a link to someone of your blog post but…it hasn’t exactly gone live yet. You can do both by way of using short links.

A short link is a way of providing a link to a post that is shorter than the permalink. Also, like I said, you can use it to send people the link to a post that has not gone live yet. (They won’t see anything until it is live). It is how I give direct links to authors of the Introduce Yourself Interviews on this blog. They can use it to go directly to their post (in case they don’t see it show up in their email or reader or if they are not already following this blog).

To access your shortlink:

After drafting your post be sure you are in the old editor.

Note: It’s easier in the old editor. I have found that if you click on the link icon next to the post headline in the new editor you can copy the link. As seen here:

 

However, it is not a short link. If anyone knows how to get the shortlink while in the new editor, it is appreciated!

So, in the old editor…

Under your headline you will see the permalink to your post or the permanent link to that post.

Right next to it you’ll see Edit….

(…..where you can edit the permalink. This is useful when you change the title to your post which I’ve done sometimes. I noticed changing the headline does not change the permalink. For the permalink to match, you’ll have to edit it. I caution that this should probably not be done if the post has already been shared. For example: I recently published a post to this blog called: “4 Ways Commenting on Other Blogs Can Help Your Blog to Grow.” I publish my post midnight my time because I know that while I am sleeping, many of you on the other side of the world is up. That said, by the time I woke up the post was already being reblogged. The problem is that I had five bullet points, not four! I changed the headline to 5 Ways Commenting on Other Blogs Can Help Your Blog to Grow. BUT I DIDN’T CHANGE THE PERMALINK. (If you notice, the link still says 4) This is because I don’t want to mess up the reblogs I already got. It would be a shame for someone to go to that link and that 404 message shows up. I am not sure if it will but I would not risk it. If the post has already gone live and you need to change the headline, leave the permalink be just in case).

….I digress (as usual, dang)

Next to edit is Get Shortlink. Click on that and copy and paste your shortlink. It is a shorter link to your post instead of the long permalink.

Note: If there is nothing written in the post, you will not see the shortlink button.

Pingbacks

When someone links to your blog or a post on your blog within their post, you get a comment in your comments section of that link back. That’s a pingback.  It means someone is literally, piggy backing off your post. This gives people a chance to share your post without re-blogging with credit back to the original owner. Google defines it:

  1. an automatic notification sent when a link has been created to a person’s blog post from an external website, allowing a reciprocal link to that website to be created.

Sometimes I pingback to my own post. Whenever I place a link to a previous post within my own blog post  it creates a pingback link in the comments section of whatever post I am linking back to. My Introduce yourself feature is the perfect example. Go to the comments section and scroll down. Because I link to the original post from every guest post, you will see them in the comments section.

Screenshot (663)

The first one is my pingback and the others are from others. Either way, they are all in the comments section of the original post. You can click on those links to go to the that post and since people can be notified of new comments (if they check “notify me of new comments” when making one), they can be notified every time a new Introduce Yourself interview is posted because it will link-back like a comment. No Writers Wednesday is the same way. Every time I say to “Click here to learn more about this segment” with a link to that original post, I am creating a new pingback in the comments section of that post. Although this was done by accident (and is always weird since I get a comment from myself) it has turned out to be a good thing. Link juice at its finest.

Pingbacks are also an alternative to re-blogging. While I’d rather reblog, ping-backs can be used to share posts as well.

How do I deal with spam comments on my blog 1: Why do people spam my blog and why should I stop them?

Since I spoke about blog comments yesterday, it’s only appropriate that I share this article on Spam. Not all comments are good comments. Liz shows how to identify a Spam comment and what to do.

LibroEditing proofreading, editing, transcription, localisation

After writing about keeping people engaged with our blogs last week, I started thinking about those people we DON’T want to engage with – spammers. In the first part of this series I’ll talk about why people might spam comment on a blog and why we shouldn’t allow them to. I’ll move on to discuss how to identify a spam comment, and then how to deal with them.

What is a spam comment on a blog?

A spam comment is a comment that isn’t relevant to the blog post it’s commenting on and is placed simply to encourage people to click through to the website the spammer is promoting. At its “best”, this is used to promote a website, usually by a third party, but at worst, it could link to a dodgy site that could contain malware or viruses.

Why do people submit spam comments to blogs?

Like those…

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Wise Ink: At First Draft: The 6 (Minimum) Steps to Revising Your Manuscript before Submission

 

Image Credit: Ten Tremendous Tips for Editing

Wondering how many revisions you should make before submitting to the professionals? Technically, as many as you want but I found this article most helpful. I love how they break it down into steps so it’s not overly complicated. I also like the idea of self-editing / revising twice then submitting the third draft to betas, and then revising once more after that. I also love the rules for Betas. Check out the post at the link below!

(BTW, it’s not a good idea to publish a 1st draft. A first draft is after you’ve finished writing the story for the first time and it has not been revised or self-edited before being submitted to an editor.)

At First Draft: The 6 (Minimum) Steps to Revising Your Manuscript before Submission

This week in Indie Publishing

This week in Indie Publishing…

Author Don Massenzio

art1Literary Agent Breaks Down How to Win in Self-Publishing

The facts don’t lie. Everyone who publishes a successful book doesn’t have a deal with a major publisher.  Over the last two decades self-publishing has flourished and the books sold by independent authors have done amazing things in the industry, including winning awards, becoming national bestsellers and even landing television or movie option deals.  Whether you are working on a children’s picture book, a romance novel, a photography or business book, or writing your memoir, if you are choosing to self-publish the following tips will help guide your endeavors.

Read the rest of this story HERE.

art2

4 Steps to Create a Blog or Podcast That You and Your Readers Will Love

If you’re a self-published author, in addition to writing and producing your books, you must take on the responsibility of marketing them. The most successful author-marketers foster strong relationships…

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Friday Roundup – 13 January

Stevie’s weekly roundups are great. Be sure to check in each week and see what goodies are there ☺.

Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

1. Chuck Sambuchino gives 38 query letter tips:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/pubtips-query

2.  Writer’s Digest tells us of 2 literary agents seeking submissions:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-rock-pascocello-glass-literary?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=wds-csa-nl-161228&utm_content=908716_GLA161228&utm_medium=email

3.  Are you writing a thriller?  Publisher Bloodhound Books are looking for submissions:

Bloodhound Books open for submissions!

4.  Colin Dunbar asks ‘Is it possible to publish a book for free?’

https://thecompleteselfpublisher.com/publish-book-for-free/

5. Gordon Long at Indies Unlimited says ‘Design your book to sell’:

http://www.indiesunlimited.com/2017/01/09/design-your-book-to-sell/#more-70153

6. Written Word Media gives us the top 10 trends in publishing that every author needs to know:

https://www.writtenwordmedia.com/2017/01/04/top-ten-trends-in-publishing-every-author-needs-to-know-in-2017/

7.  Blonde Write More gives us 10 things her creative friends have taught her about blogging (I especially like the one that begins ‘If you aren’t in the arena…’):

10 Things My Creative Friends Have Taught Me #Monday Blogs #BloggingGals #AmWriting

8.  Andrew Joyce introduces Sunrise Editing Services via Chris, the Story Reading Ape’s blog:

Introducing: Sunrise Editing Services…

9.  Thanks to Rachel Poli for these Jan/Feb writing…

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Welcome!

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It’s been a minute since I’ve welcomed all of the newbies in. Of late, I’ve been blessed to receive quite a few follows and I’d like to say, welcome to The PBS Blog! (*throws invisible confetti*) I also want to thank our regulars for liking, commenting and reblogging our posts. I recognize your support as a vital instrument to the growth of this blog.

In the meantime, please be sure to visit the About Page to learn more about me and this blog.

One thing I do often on this blog is re-post older post with or without mention that it is a repost  I do this to rotate the blog post that may not have gotten much attention when it was originally published or (and most especially) to give those new to this blog an opportunity to see them.  Learn more about how you can self-evaluate your blog by re-spinning posts Here.

For your convenience, I’ve noted a few links below to get you started in your exploration of this blog! They are some of the most popular posts. Check them out and be sure to let me know what you’d like to see more of. I have a number of features that will be returning real soon.

If Your Blog Was a Resume

Blogger Support: Fact or Fiction?

The First 300: How I Reached 300 Blog Followers in 3 Months

Why I Use Images In (Almost) All of My Blog Posts

Writing 101 Assignments

To Write a Heart

Dear Poetry

Why I Write Black

The Right Poem