The Sound of Silence

Photo by Arthur Brognoli from Pexels

A lot is going on in the world, so I sit here bathed in solitude and fishing for a thought. Let the noisy silence of second hands and chirping birds lend me the inspiration needed to write. Let the calm of the rain suicide its face onto my windowsill, onto shingled rooftops, ripping puddles, or perhaps it will only melt itself into the concrete.

Have you ever sat back and listened to silence? It is hypocritically noisy. I can hear the laughter of locusts and the singing of birds as they intercourse themselves into the wind. This noisy wind. It whistles and shouts and spreads its hum across the troposphere, just silent enough for us not to notice amid the growling of car engines and groaning of electricity. If you listen closely enough, you’ll hear angels sing in the wind.

Give me not the physical right now. Not the booming lyric of music or the chatter of distraction. Give me focus so I may snag a thought from the roaring voices of spirit and memory hanging from the pictures on my wall. We are familiar with the sound of noise, but not the noise of silence. Not the tickle of an idea brushing past our thoughts or the seductive wooing of trees to wind. The giggling fabric against the windowsill. The peaceful lullabies of daylight.

Indeed, nature has its way of suckering us out of quiet, but what an incredible stillness.

Yecheilyah’s Book List 2021

Hey guys!

As we wrap up 2021, I thought I’d copy off Barrack Obama and share my book list, a combination of Trade and Indie books I read this year. This list is based on books I’ve read or am reading now. I missed a lot of hot releases reading for research, so I only got around to about twenty books this year, and not all of them were published in 2021. And for the sake of time, I will not talk about every book.

So heerree we go.

Just as I am by Cicely Tyson

This list is in no particular order, but if it was, this would still be the number one read for me this year. Publishing a memoir is among many of my author goals, and the way this was structured is precisely what I have in mind. Cicely Tyson’s Just as I am is not only a memoir. It is a magnifying glass on 96 years of black history told through the eyes of someone who lived it in real-time. A perfect blend of personal testimony with the political and social climate of the times, a poetic proclamation to some of the most historical events of the 20th Century. 

The Secret Lives of Church Ladies by Deesha Philyaw

Listen, if you can get me to read your book and keep reading it or think about it so much when I am not reading it, I want to pick it up at my earliest convenience to finish, then you can make the top of my list. This book was hilarious and thought-provoking at the same time. It was also refreshing that the book was not too long and engaging enough to read in one sitting. I hadn’t done that in a while. I enjoyed it.

Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans

I read the first half of this book at the library while I was supposed to be reading Amanda’s new book. No shade to Gorman, but I had to let hers sit to the side a lil bit reading this here. I love Jasmine’s rawness. She is all fire and straightforwardness. When I got home, I bought my own copy.

Promise That You Will Sing for Me: The Power and Poetry of Kendrick Lamar by Miles Marshall Lewis

For clarity, this is not a memoir. It is biography written by pop culture critic, essayist, literary editor, fiction writer, and music journalist Miles Marshall Lewis. I really like how he structured this, mixing pop culture, some hip-hop history leading up to Kendrick’s birth, and Lamar’s coming of age story.

The Hill We Climb by Amanda Gorman

Because I heard this poem recited first at the Presidential Inauguration, it’s so fun to read because Gorman’s voice is in my head. I can read this repeatedly because it’s short and inspiring.

Will (Currently reading)

I literally just got this book yesterday, but I had to put it on the list because I think Will is dope so I know this book will be entertaining. Looking forward to digging in.

The Love Songs of W.E.B. Dubois by Honoree Fanonne Jeffers

This book is mad thick, so no, I have not finished reading it. What I have read so far is good, though, and I will be picking this back up again for sure.

The Queen V: Everything You Need to Know About Sex, Intimacy, and Down There Health Care by Dr. Jackie Walters

Ladies, listen. There are so many myths surrounding this here vajayjay of ours. Do yourself a favor and grab a copy of this book by Married to Medicine’s Jackie Walters. She’s an MD of Comprehensive Women’s OB/GYN, located in Duluth and Dunwoody, Georgia, and is a household name in the Atlanta area. If you know her from the show, the book reads in her voice, which is cool.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

If you want to learn about how the US government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods, this the one.

Immersed in West Africa by Terry Lister (Indie)

I enjoyed “traveling” with this author on his journey through Senegal, Mauritania, The Gambia, Guinea, and Guinea Bissau.

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen

They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South (Current Research Book)

Chile. If you want a history of Karen’s behavior, babbyy. This the one.

Family Medicine: A Psychological Suspense Thriller (Indie)

Call Us What We Carry by Amanda Gorman (Currently reading)

I am not as invested in this one as I was in the first one, but I’m still enjoying it.

Things I Wish I Said by AVG (Indie)

Fields of Grace by Wendy Waters (Indie)

Capitalism and Slavery by Eric Williams (Research Book)

Ya’ll notice my nails got better in the latter part of the year? Cause this was this summer, and what in the messy nail polish is going on here, lol.

Living in the Land of I am: Your Life Journey Reveals Your Purpose by Tiffany James (Indie)

Life After Death by Sister Souljah

I had such high hopes for this book. Read my full review here.

She Wins (Indie)

When Poets Pray by Marilyn McEntyre

I did not enjoy this book like I thought I would. I should have researched it more, but I judged it by its cover and title, both of which I think are awesome. But I’m gonna have to pass.

I’m Speaking Now: Black Women Share Their Truth in 101 Stories of Love, Courage, and Hope

A compelling anthology. Highly recommended.

Books I Didn’t Get Around to but Want to Read:

The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story by Nikole Hannah-Jones

The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris

Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas

Feeding the Soul by Tabitha Brown

You Got Anything Stronger? by Gabrielle Union

And that’s my book list for 2021!

Have you read any on this list? Tell me your favorite!

Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews: Life After Death by Sister Souljah

Title: Life After Death
Author: Sister Souljah
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Published: March 2, 2021
ASIN: B08BZVTLWX
Pages: 349

I purchased this book when it dropped in March and promised to share my thoughts. That was nine months ago, and I want to deliver on my word.

The Plot is in the Title

Life After Death is the much anticipated second sequel to Sister Souljah’s explosive bestseller, The Coldest Winter Ever. The first thing I noticed is the plot is in the title.

Winter Santiaga is still in prison and negotiating a deal with her brother-in-law, Elisha, for a reality TV show on her release. But before Winter could make her grand debut, she gets shot.

And this is where the story goes to a place I did not want to go.

The rest of the book are the details of Winter’s experience in the after-world. Neither heaven nor hell, she floats around in a kind of purgatory.

What in the American Horror Story is going on here?

There is a bit of a twist at the end, but unfortunately for me, it was not enough to save the book. It also didn’t help that I predicted the twist from the beginning so I didn’t even have the satisfaction of that to help how I would rate it.

Urban Fiction? Paranormal? Sci-Fi? Magical Realism?

Pushed as an urban fiction novel, Life After Death actually reads like a paranormal story. The book is heavy on religion and metaphysics and I found it dark and hard to get through.

The beginning leading up to the bizarre other-world was not too bad, though I did think the Life After Death Winter sounds a lot less mature than the Winter from the end of book one. To understand what I mean let’s do a quick recap of the end of The Coldest Winter Ever.

At the end of The Coldest Winter Ever, Winter is still street, but has been humbled after serving seven years in prison. With eight more years to go, she is shackled and accompanied by guards to attend her mother’s funeral. She talks about how breathing is different, the feel of the sun on her face and the smell of the food.

As the book comes to an end and Winter sees the family, her middle sister Porsche rolls up in a Mercedes Benz dressed like a million bucks. Winter can already tell the road she’s headed and thinks about warning Porsche about the life she’s living. She decides to let it be. The girl will have to see for herself.

Fast forward to Life After Death.

This Winter is negotiating a deal for a $50,000 per episode reality TV show, hooded three-quarter-length mink coat, Python sky-high boots, red Gucci driving gloves, an activated iPhone, and a red carpet welcome out of the door.

Mmkay.

It would seem she would be far removed from that kind of lifestyle by now.

Preachy

There is a lot of talk about Islam that came across as highly preachy. I don’t mean bits and pieces here and there. I mean whole pages about how Allah does what Allah pleases, Allah chose the language of Arabic as the language of the Holy Quran, so forth and so on. As one reviewer summed up:

“My only criticism is the strong Muslim leaning; without spoiling, I felt the portrayal of the nuns in the convent was unnecessarily offensive. An interesting read! But if you’re looking for a TCWE II you will be disappointed.”

Winter’s Life After Death journey is an experience into the world of the deeply spiritual practices of Islam as Souljah sees it. After she enters this world, everything feels like a sermon with Winter’s life as the conduit, the vehicle from which the message is given.

Put plainly: it feels like Souljah wanted to write a book about religion because of the trauma of the 2020 Pandemic and used her most famous character to do it. According to her Instagram:

“I wrote LIFE AFTER DEATH in 2020, a year of great loss, huge disasters, raging fires, violent storms, virulent viruses and the whole world shaken by the body count. Everything everyone worshiped besides GOD was either brought to a complete stand still or vanished into thin air.” – Sister Souljah

I get it, but readers feel deceived. They thought they were buying the follow-up to what is arguably one of the best urban fiction books of their young adulthood, only to read about Souljah’s “EXTREMELY polarizing and generally terrible opinions and belief,” as one reviewer puts it. 

“I didn’t buy this book to read Souljah’s religious and uber conservative rhetoric, I bought this book to finish Winter’s story. If she couldn’t write that she should’ve just said that instead of giving us a weird ass bestiality scene and making Winter make increasingly erratic and poor decisions to justify the religious crap she stuffed the plot with.”

The marketing gave us the impression the book would pick up where The Coldest Winter Ever left off. In truth, it is a different book. Fans of the novel say it’s not supposed to be the same, but the promotion says otherwise. Even the covers are similar.

“People who are saying “This is not supposed to be the Coldest Winter Ever” – it is literally the follow-up to TCWE lol!!! Of course we were expecting an extension of it!” – Amazon Customer Review

I believe this would have been better received had she created an entirely new character with no connection to Winter.

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

I do want to give Souljah credit for attempting to pen something deeper than your traditional Street Lit. You can tell she wanted Winter to evolve and that she had a message she wanted to give her readers.

You can also tell by how many people said they “waited 20 years for nothing” did not read the first sequel. If you read A Deeper Love Inside, Souljah’s religious messages are not a total surprise. Although, I didn’t enjoy that book either.

“Unrealistic. Dragged. Boring. Depressing. It was in need of a serious plot twist that never came.” – Amazon Customer Review

I would have worded it differently (knowing what it feels like as an author to get such feedback), but this person is spot on.

The religious parts in Life After Death would also make more sense to readers of the Midnight series:

“Its written for Souljah fans who have read the Midnight series. Not that the story is particularly relevant, but there are A LOT of references to Islam that might not make sense entirely except Midnight explained them in his series.”

I do believe there is an audience for this book and that had it been marketed to that audience as a standalone novel in the paranormal or even religious genre, readers would have had a better idea of what they were getting.

“If she wanted to write about these kinds of things don’t mislead the readers into thinking we were getting another Winter experience, clearly it was not. The story is  hard to digest. The only reason a lot of us purchased it was under the guise of it really being an actual sequel to one of the best reads.”

“Souljah wrote the book that SHE wanted to write, not what her readers wanted to read.”

I can only rate this book two stars. It is two stars instead of one because I did enjoy the start of the book. It seemed promising until Winter went into the sunken place.


Note: I was not paid for this review. I bought the book, read it on my own time, and these are my thoughts. To have your work reviewed through my paid service, you must register your book here and it must rate 3-5 stars to be published on this blog. Reviews of books I read on my own are published regardless of rating. 

Let’s Stay in Touch

Hey ya’ll, hey.

With yesterday’s social media shenanigans, I want to drop in to give some tidbits about how to join my author list for those of you who might not be subscribed but thought you were.

First, you should know subscribing to this blog is not the same as subscribing to my author email list.

  • Subscribing to this blog ensures you receive email notifications every time I publish a blog post.

  • Subscribing to my author list means you receive email notifications whenever I have author news to share for myself and other authors. These emails go out about once or twice a month.

“I Thought I was Already Subscribed But I Don’t Get Your Newsletters”

Due to excessive spam emails and inactivity, I deleted all emails from the first list and started over. If you remember my emails, but noticed they have stopped, it means you are not subscribed to the new list.

Because I want to make sure those who signed up want to sign up, I am not re-subscribing people manually. You must click on the link below to add your email back to the list.

When You Subscribe to my Author List:

  • You receive a free ecopy of my award-winning poetry collection, I am Soul.

  • You get first dibs on book reviews and other services I might offer. My review registry is currently closed for 2021, but my email members get the first chance at registering early. I will pick books from authors on my list first.

  • You get an inside look at what’s going on behind the scenes of my work, a summary of any blog posts you might have missed, and links to writing resources I might have discovered since we last connected.

  • If anything happens like yesterday’s outage, you are not left in the dark about what’s going on with me or the services I provide.

Click on the link below to connect with me. You will know you did it right when you receive a welcome email.

Ready???

Click HERE to Join My Community

See you soon!

Yecheilyah’s 4th Annual Poetry Contest Winners 2021: Jasmina Jammison

IG_Poetry(9)

Introducing Jasmina Jammison

Instagram: jillrxse

Please, tell us what inspired your poem.

I wanted to challenge myself with this poem. I have a love for Greek Mythology that I wanted to incorporate into it. But that is just a part of it. My main inspiration was my current relationship. I’ve learned patience and communication, which was something I lacked in other relationships. I also learned self-love and how important it is to have. You’re supposed to be learning how to love someone else, and the best way to start that is to know how you want and need to be loved first.

Well said!

What do you love most about poetry?

I love the freedom of expression when it comes to poetry. Everyone’s voice is different, but we could all be going through the same thing, and your words need to be heard. Poetry is healing and therapy to me. That’s what I love the most. Being able to put everything down on paper and releasing it. I perform most of my poems, and the stage is where I get the most out of it. Letting the pain and stress or discomfort out in the open for everyone to hear and not to have to worry about it be bottled up inside anymore.

Beautiful. We’d love to hear you recite your poetry one day! We’ll have to set that up. For now, you are a new contestant. In what way do you think contests such as this one are beneficial to authors?

Contests like these are beneficial because of the exposure and the opportunity to step out and be bold. I stepped out of my comfort zone when entering, and I placed. Sometimes you have to step out on faith and believe in yourself, and these contests give authors like myself a place to be bold.

How did you get started writing?

I started writing young. I never really took it seriously. I just knew I loved poetry. I started taking my poetry seriously during my first year of college. I read a poem I wrote to a friend, and she asked me why I hadn’t performed any of my pieces. I had terrible stage fright back then. I would never have dreamed of actually being on stage and performing something I wrote. It scared me to think of what others would think about my inner thoughts, but I loved it. Loved opening my truth up to others because some people felt just the way I did. I found a family that wanted to help me perfect my craft and push myself. I owe a lot to the Deep Release Poetry Society at Valdosta State University. Without that organization, I wouldn’t have challenged myself or continued with my writing.

I admire all the winning poems this year because you guys stepped outside the box.

In your case, you used the Greek Goddess Aphrodite, the ancient goddess of love and beauty. What went into this decision? What was the process of writing this poem like for you?

I pulled all my best ideas into this one. I wanted to make sure everything made sense, so I did some research to ensure I had my Greek Mythology right. The first night I started writing, something happened. I can’t remember what exactly, but I did not finish it that night. It actually took me longer than I thought to finish the ending, but it came together. I enjoyed writing this poem because of the care I put into it.

What would you say is your writing strength and weakness?

My writing strength would have to be relatability. I write to make the reader feel what I mean, not just read it. I want my words to bring out the emotion as much as possible to get the message across. When it comes to my weakness, it would have to be not finishing certain pieces and stopping. I have a bad habit sometimes of having writer’s block and just leaving it there. I have many short poems that need some love.

I feel you. Are you working on any writing projects/books?

I am working on a project and hopefully a book as well. It is still in the beginning stages, but I am hoping to get it launched in the next year.

Yess! Well, be sure to let me know. I’m here for it.

Where do you see yourself a year from now?

I see myself winning more contests, haha.

Okay, you sound like Dondi!

But seriously, I see myself taking my writing to the next level. I know that I have the potential to do more, and I’m ready to act. Sometimes we fall short of knowing what we are capable of, and we stop ourselves from doing more. But this time next year, I hope to have one book under my belt.

That’s right, sis. Speak it into existence! Be on the lookout for her book next year, ya’ll.

And without further ado, I introduce to you “The Secret Garden,” by Jasmina Jammison

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Photo by Kilyan Sockalingum on Unsplash

I once dreamed I lived in the Secret Garden
Where I mastered patience and understanding
Where dreams were reality
Where faith didn’t have to be the size
Of a mustard seed
And she lived there with me

We knew each other in and out
In this garden, we were mythological
Like something out of a Greek novel
Aphrodite graced us with her presence

And we learned love without conditions.
We shared passions and pains
Learned how to inhale peace with every breath
She loved me for just me, every ounce of me
But this is a Secret Garden after all

I woke up
Because dreams are only real when you’re asleep
There was no us
It was just me
No garden to hide in
No one to love my flaws
Cupid didn’t exist in this world
No arrows to hit me with
No infinite peace

So I learned how to build
How to pick up bricks of my past
Lay down and surrender to every slab
Of cement in between
And mold a fence of love and understanding

We can build the Secret Garden.
With every ounce of despair
With every love lost
With the love of oneself
We can build a mansion

I know this because she is here
In the walls of this fence
And she loves me for just me

She picked up my bricks
And helped me build
I put down her insecurities
As she laid down my losses in cement
Together we know peace and intimacy

We built this mansion on a foundation
Of affliction
She gave me the blueprints to her heart
And I made a note of every measurement
Handmade every detail to perfection
Carved my name in the outline of her heart
And I pray she’ll keep me there forever

Because this love only comes
Once in a lifetime
we made sure this house wouldn’t collapse
These walls are too sturdy
We never needed the Secret Garden
To build what we have
Aphrodite taught us that

Copyright©2021 Jasmina Jammison

Yecheilyah’s 4th Annual Poetry Contest Winners 2021: Dondi A. Springer

Introducing Dondi A. Springer

Instagram: napalmjax

Please, tell us what inspired your poem.

My inspiration for this poem was really the essence of life itself. Without love, there is no life.

Hmm. I like that! What do you love most about poetry?

I love the wordplay, how you can paint a picture, tell a story, or escape into your own little world. Better yet, you can sing a beautiful song and not sing one note.

You are a returning contestant. What would you say are some benefits of contests like this to writers?

Some benefits of a contest like this is not just the exposure as a poet or writer, but the opportunity to meet other poets from all over. Plus, being able to showcase versatility and depth with a theme.

What I always admire about your poetry is what I like about your answers so far. It’s powerful in its simplicity. You don’t say a lot, but what you do say, I can tell, is from your heart, from the soul. That’s not easy to do.

Tell us, what was the process of writing this poem like for you?

The process of writing this poem for me was actually kind of challenging. Writing to a theme is not always easy, as it makes you think and stretch your creative muscle. Once I got the direction I wanted to go with, the words came easy.

What would you say is your writing strength and weakness?

My writing comes mostly from my life’s experiences and personal growth. So I would have to say that’s my writing strength and my weakness. I have no technical training. I just like to write. When it comes to poetry, I just throw the rules out the window and write it how I feel it.

I love it! And I think it’s what sets you apart. Are you working on any writing projects/books?

Yes. I am working on a project and a book. I have a short inspirational book called “Can’t Stay Here” that I’m doing edits on right now. Also, I’m working on a memoir about my journey into veganism, called “Vegan-is-M(e)/Deeper Than A Diet.”

Nice! Well, we congratulate you on all your endeavors and wish you the best. I’m really looking forward to t”Can’t Stay Here!”

Where do you see yourself a year from now?

A year from now, I see myself back here, competing for the grand prize, and blogging.

That’s the spirit! Dondi said he coming back, ya’ll! I love to see it.

And without further ado, I introduce to you “Love Is,” by Dondi A. Springer

Photo by Joseph Barrientos on Unsplash

Love is a life that flows like a fluid
An infinite vibration like waves of an ocean
Touching your soul, the arrow of a cupid
That breath of fresh air, when life’s undercurrent comes grasping
To some, it comes freely,
to others, it comes while kneeling.
That long labor of love is where you will find compassion
The blind will see the light to walk out of their plight
It is the fluid of life
More than just a feeling, love becomes a part of your being
It runs deep in your veins,
limitless like the astroplane
Love makes us all relate, with no space for hate
So we are all connected in this space
Love is…

Copyright©2021 Dondi A. Springer

Yecheilyah’s 4th Annual Poetry Contest Winners 2021: ZerahYah Ysrayl

Introducing ZerahYah Ysrayl

Instagram: shining_of_yah

Please, tell us what inspired your poem.

In a world that sometimes seems void of all things good, being a single woman, I thought of love on an intimate level. My mind processed what it would feel like and look like, and that poem resulted from that vision.

It’s a beautiful poem and it’s the only one that spoke of love from a parental point of view. You named the poem “Unknown.” Can you walk us through what’s behind that title? Why the unknown?

I named my poem “Unknown” because up until that point, love was something for me that wasn’t just surface. It was a deep, soul-warming feeling from bringing life into this world where I experienced the unknown. It was different, it was new, and it was foreign to me. I now know that parental love is the best love. Often, we associate love with love between man and woman, overlooking the love between mother and child. This love never changes. No matter what, it never wavers. In my thought process, the unknown is the best known, my experience.

What do you love most about poetry?

Poetry is one of the most beautiful forms of expression I have ever encountered. It’s like giving a voice to the soul. It can be a healer to both the writer as well as the reader.

I agree! Tell us, how did you get started writing?

I grew up in a broken home. The chaos of it all would have my mind racing so much that I started writing my thoughts and my feelings down just to relieve the pain. Then, when I entered middle school as a form of escape, I joined a drama class. The first poem I ever heard was “A Dream Deferred” by Langston Hughes. It was short but powerful. At that moment, I decided I wanted to turn this pain into something beautiful, and the process began.

You are a returning contestant, and it is something I always admired about you. You always came in as an honorable mention, but you didn’t give up. You kept coming back, and it has paid off. This year, you have placed.

How does that feel and what is behind the persistence? What makes you keep entering?

I’ve heard many say that they don’t enter contests because it can weaken your confidence, or they don’t want their art judged. I’m the opposite. I have never been a quitter. Although I’m still a babe in this art, my goal is to perfect, which can only be done by challenging myself, taking criticism from those more experienced than me, and rendering myself vulnerable and humble to those that have spent years perfecting their craft.

Every year I have accepted my honorable mention not as a defeat but as a means to come back stronger and more mature. This year, I placed, and it felt good. However, my work is not done. I will continue to examine and push myself. I’m coming for that number one spot. They say practice makes perfect.

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Listen. It’s the confidence for me! Sis said she coming.

What would you say are some benefits of contests like this to writers?

It gives the writer exposure, and it helps to strengthen the skills of the writer. You get to share a little bit of yourself with the world, and you never know who you may touch along your journey.

What was the process of writing this poem like for you?

I have always been my worst critic. However, I wanted some maturity to show in my writing skills on this one since the topic was so heavy. I wrote and rewrote a few times. But once I tapped into what the word love really meant to me, the words became clearer. All I needed to do was write.

What would you say is your writing strength and weakness?

My strength would definitely be my ability to speak on any topic without fear. I can bare my soul with complete confidence that my words will resonate with someone. My weakness is that I’m not consistent and unable to remember what I write, so it stays in a book most of the time. I need to share my talent more.

Are you working on any writing projects/books?

I’m currently not working on anything in particular. I write all the time, so I’m just waiting for the opportunity to share.

Where do you see yourself a year from now?

I will continue to mature my writing skills. I also would like to work on some spoken words. Writing a poem is one thing, but reciting it is a whole different experience. Poetry is such an underrated art. I want to continue to be a part of keeping poetry alive. Who knows what the future may hold. My book may be coming to a store near you soon.

That’s what I wanna hear!

And without further ado, I introduce to you “Unknown,” by ZerahYah Ysrayl:

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Photo by Mustafa Omar on Unsplash

The epitome of love I carried in my womb.
Every flutter, every kick brought about abundant joy.
Nauseous and excitingly waiting to give birth to a nation.
As my body morphed to make space
a delectable glow filled my face.
The heartbeat was music to my ears
like an ancestral drum beating in the distance
silencing my fears.

The weight on my bladder
the swelling in my feet
it was worth it cause it was pure love I was to meet.
As stretch marks began to cover my abdominal,
I begin to feel something phenomenal.
The conception of perfection
a body within a body
ten toes, two feet
the divinity of the creator giving life through me.

It was an umbilical connection being nurtured from the beginning, and it has no end
As my pelvis expanded,
the pain sent a thrust through my veins
straight to my brain.
Like a volcanic eruption, I think that’s the best way to explain
My introduction took 15 hours, no sedatives
in the room me and my grandmother
my closest relative.

My first gaze upon his tiny face,
my heart was beating faster than the normal pace.
At that moment, I experienced three degrees of love
Unconditional, Agape, and Infinite
For me, parent to child love was and is
the ultimate.

Copyright©2021 ZerahYah Ysrayl