Republishing Posts: Don’t Forget to Update Your Links

Some time ago I spoke about the benefits of Respinning your blog posts. By respin I mean republishing them to your blog. This means that the post will show up again in the reader and your followers will also get an email notifying them of a new blog post.

Check out the original post HERE.

This has great advantages to building up your blog, such as:

  • Older posts are seen by new readers
  • Important posts get more social media shares and reiterates key points for those who missed it
  • New Followers / Views

The list goes on with the key thing being new readers and more eyes on posts that may not have received much attention the first time around.

What I didn’t talk about is the not-so-good things about republishing content. One thing to keep in mind (especially if the post you are republishing did very well the first time and got lots of shares):

When you reschedule / republish a post to show up again and you linked it somewhere, the original link to the post will not work.

This means you would want to unlink the old and replace it with the new one. If you do not do this, when readers click on the original link they’ll get a “This post no longer exists” error message.

This post came about because I am literally in the process of doing this now with re-linking my Black History Fun Fact links. I rescheduled a few from 2015 but didn’t relink them. Yesterday, I viewed the page and noticed some links didn’t work and I am not sure how long it’s been that way. Oppsie. I searched my posts for the republished version with the new date, copied the link and linked the new one.

If you’d like to archive your posts (saving them to a page) or link a post to text:

Highlight the words you want to link.

Click on the link icon in your blog post editor…

…. in that little box, paste your link.

IF you want to have the page open in a new tab, click on the Link Options icon next to the blue button as seen above. A box will open that looks like…

….THIS

Check the Open link in new tab box. When people click on your link, it will open the page in a new tab. This is optional and up to you. Some readers prefer it and others don’t.

I would be careful republishing any post that received lots of reblogs and social media shares already. I would be careful because the links shared on social media may no longer work and you’ll have to manually announce/correct it. I would also not recommend republishing content too much (I’ve slowed down myself since the first article) Additionally, if the article lists data, statistics or in-depth research like that, I wouldn’t republish it UNLESS I also plan to update the data.

Posts I would respin:

  • Old posts that only received one, two, or three likes and no shares
  • Posts with important information but did not get many views and no shares
  • Poetry / Inspirational posts that never gets old but received not too many shares

Remember, if you republish/respin/repost an older article for more visibility and you’re linking that post, the republished post will have a new link (I also think you can change the link to keep it the same in the editor but I have not experienced this and this post is only in relation to my own experience.)

If you are republishing content and linked something to it, be sure to update the link so that when we click on it we are taken to the article, not an error message.

 

Enjoy the rest of your week!

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Time to get back to work.
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Black History Fun Fact Friday Returns

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As long as you’re trying to change a system within that system it will never work. If you were never designed to be part of the system, you cannot expect that system to treat you with fairness. If you never intended for a people to be free within your gates there will always be laws in place to ensure that they are never freed. Chattel Slavery, Black Codes, Jim Crow, Convict Leasing, Police Brutality and the like are all examples of America ensuring that a people remain as they were intended to be, slaves.

I am just a week in my new place and still without internet and have been blogging from my phone, but Black History Fun Fact Friday is returning soon.

We’ll be starting a series (because it’ll take multiple posts) on:

The History of Oppression in America

We’ll touch on the hidden message behind the #TakeAKnee protests, The relocation of Japanese-Americans into internment camps during World War II, the stealing of Native American land, the stigmatizing of Mexicans in the 30s (the origin of the name Marijuana for cannabis to make it seem like a “Mexican Drug”) the Drug Enforcement Act of 1914, the War on Drugs that promoted crack as the Black man’s drug and the association of Heroin with Chinese American Immigrants in the late 1800s, early 1900s.

Meanwhile, you can catch up on previous Black History Fun Facts by visiting the page HERE.


Stay tuned and enjoy the weekend.

 

REMINDER: Dear Book Bloggers (and others promoting authors) – Guest Post by, Yecheilyah Ysrayl…

REPOST from The Story Reading Ape Blog. Please click the link below for the original post to my latest guest post.

Also, I am actually back from my break so excuse that tidbit. I wrote this a couple months ago.

http://wp.me/p3mGq7-gup

Controlling the Energy Around You

As many of you know, I’ve been doing lots of personal reflection. My focus has been on healing and love. This included taking some extensive time off to spend with Yah, my family, embracing solitude and doing more writing.

In this process, I’ve learned a lot about myself (still learning), got to spend time with my mom, finished two books and moved to Georgia.

Long story short, this break has paid off in more ways than one and I want to share with you something I shared with my Bimonthly email list already. That is, learning to control the energy around you so that you’re more positive, have more energy, are happier and accomplishing more.

To start, I’ve been practicing this by training my mind to be more positive.

Positive Thoughts

Many are already talking about the power of positive thinking, but how does that look in action?

What I’ve come to understand about the power of thought is how much our thoughts contribute to our physical well-being.

We can literally control the energy around us by the quality of our thoughts.

This means that I cannot focus my thoughts on the negative all day, every day and expect to be happy and energetic. If you wake up complaining, go to work complaining, blog your complaints, Tweet and Facebook your complaints, how do you (realistically speaking) expect to have a good day?

This includes limiting what my ears hear and what my eyes see. I can think positively but thinking positive is not enough.

I must also eliminate negative people, places, and things from my life that influences the way that I think.

Why is this important? Because we cannot heal in the same environment that broke us.

I’ve found that watching and listening to what is less negatively stimulating can help me to think less negatively. 

An example of this online is following more positive minded people on social media and accounts that encourage and build up instead of tear down. I removed those persons whose energy brought me down and followed those whose energy built me up. This doesn’t mean those I removed are bad people or that I love them less. It means that I love myself enough to protect my energy.

This process of falling back in love with ourselves begins with setting standards for what we will and will not tolerate. This is important because you teach people how to love you based on what you allow to take place.

Mental Rest

My break has been more so about mental rejuvenation more than physically. Being tired all the time does not necessarily mean that you’ve had a productive day. It may mean that you are busy but it doesn’t always mean that you’ve been productive. Sometimes it means it is mental rest that you need.

Because the spiritual (mind) and the physical (body) is connected, once we control the way we think we automatically control the way that we feel. Sure, I can get more hours of sleep (and I should) but…

ultimately it is my excitement and passion about the good in my life that will fill me up with positive and empowering energy.

Or, it is my depressed demeanor that will do the opposite.

Your mind can tire you out or fill you up.

For this, I am personally striving to cut down on complaining and worrying by focusing instead on positive thoughts and alternatives. This is not easy, is a daily process, and also means not allowing others to project their negative energy onto me. Giving into other people’s problems or letting people complain to us too much can drain our energy and leave us empty.

Being an ear is great but there’s a difference between being supportive and just letting people dump their issues in our laps.

We are not toilets and shouldn’t allow ourselves to be used.

Do not misunderstand me: Venting can be a good thing. Having someone to talk to is mentally healthy but in the words of Rudy Francisco:

“Some people will take until you have nothing left and then hold a grudge against your hands for being empty.”


Next, we’ll talk about some backlashes to the new and positive you and how to stay encouraged despite them. In a world this cold anything good is bound to be met with opposition. This should not surprise us. In fact, we should prepare for it.

Keep Yourself Full

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Hey, guys! How have you been? I missed you so much and many thanks to those of you who have reached out to me during my time away to make sure I was OK. I appreciate you.

I’ve been wonderful and though I’ve only been gone a few weeks, that time is so much longer in blog days :-).

And I am scheduled for more traveling this weekend.

While I managed to stay away from Facebook, Twitter, this blog and my email until this past Saturday, I broke my Insta-silence when, while walking down the streets of Chicago with my sister, someone recognized me. At first, I was going to just walk away but I noticed the woman was trying to pronounce my name. I finished it for her.

“e-see-lee-yah.”
“I have your book!” said the woman.
“Really? Wow.”
“I follow you on Facebook.”
“Really?”

And so we chatted it up, took a picture, and she missed her bus. It was a wonderful feeling and very inspiring.

Being away from the blog has produced a surprising increase in views and subscribers since I did pretty much nothing.
30+ Views and Visitors a day
50+ new subscribers
4 New Book Reviews
2 New Goodreads Ratings
16 New Twitter Followers

 

If you need to take a break from blogging, writing, or whatever, it’s OK. We will still be here when you get back. You may even grow in the process. It’s all about recharging and Keeping Yourself Full which leads me to my next bit of news…

Introducing…

Keep Yourself Full

“To Heal the Hurting, Lift the Fallen, and Restore the Broken.”

About this Book:

KEEP YOURSELF FULL is a short book of spiritual rejuvenation to keep you charged and YOUR reminder that life is about more than just surviving, but making the greatest impact you can while you are here. It is about caring about something greater than yourself. There’s only one problem:

many of us are so depressed that we don’t have enough of ourselves to give to others.

We’ve heard it all before: “Hurt people, hurt people.” When people are limited and insecure and hurting they pass this energy onto others. When you are low yourself, when you’re not full, you unconsciously send out the same kind of energy and you begin to treat others how you feel about yourself.

Imagine if more people felt good about themselves and projected that energy. Imagine if you could vibrate higher.

Empowering others is great but first, you must be empowered. Sharing is wonderful but you cannot serve from an empty vessel. In every instance, you must come first since you cannot give what you don’t already own. Only after you have loved yourself can you love others.

Keeping Yourself Full is about investing in your own well-being first so that you can be of service to others. It is a building process that reveals little by little our purpose as we overcome ourselves.

You will not always be motivated and anyone who says that is not being real. There is a time for everything, even war. The fact remains that you will not always be peaceful and everyday ain’t beautiful.

What we have to learn to be is disciplined so that we can think logically instead of emotionally and so that we can train our mind not to take everything so personally.

Everything people do and say is not a reflection of you. When we rid ourselves of these kinds of burdens, we break free.

You can be happy today, but without a shift in perspective, this happiness will not last.

You must change the way that you think to change the way that you feel.

Healthy self-care nourishes the quality of our  life and is necessary for stopping the cycle of depression, abuse, and suicide.

You cannot serve from an empty vessel. You must keep yourself full.

Coming Soon

Why I Built an ARC Team (and what it is) – Guest Blog Post by Yecheilyah Ysrayl

This post is scheduled. Be sure to stop by Dan’s blog for my latest Guest Post. I am still away but will be over to respond to your commentary at my earliest convenience.

Comments are disabled. Please click on the link below for the original post.

https://danalatorre.com/2017/08/29/why-i-built-an-arc-team-and-what-it-is-guest-blog-post-by-yecheilyah-ysrayl/

Click on the link or image below to join my team.

getpart-1http://eepurl.com/cNWHKD 

The First “African” Slaves Arrive in Jamestown, Virginia, Aug. 20, 1619

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My messy desk…studying my history

“A Dutch ship carrying 20 Africans arrived in Jamestown, Virginia, on Aug. 20, 1619, a voyage that would mark the beginning of slavery in the American colonies. The number of slaves continued to grow between the 17th and 18th centuries, as slave labor was used to help fuel the growing tobacco and cotton industries in the southern states. At the end of the Civil War in 1865, some 4 million slaves were set free. However, racial inequalities and violence toward newly freed slaves would persist in the country throughout the 1860s and 1870s.”

– Source, BET National News

“The arrival of the “20 and odd” African captives aboard a Dutch “man of war” ship on this day (August 20) in the year 1619 historically marks the early planting of the seeds of the American slave trade.” (Benjamin Banneker also challenged Slavery In Letter On This Day In 1791)

Source, Ioned Chandler, Newsone

“Today in 1619, it was reported by English tobacco farmer John Rolfe, husband of famed Indian princess Pocahontas, that “20 and odd” African slaves arrived at the Jamestown Settlement in British colonial North America aboard a Dutch man-of-war ship. The ship had originated in the Portuguese colonies of present-day Angola, which had been established in the 1500s. Angola was a heavy exporter of slaves to Brazil and the Spanish colonies.”

Source, Infobox

“Newly established English colonies in North America create a demand for laborers in the New World. At first, captured Africans are brought to the colonies as indentured servants. Once their term (3-7 years) is completed, indentured servants are allowed to live free, own land, and have indentured servants of their own. However, this system does not last long; indentured servitude gives way to lifetime slavery for Africans as the British colonies grow and the need for a permanent, inexpensive labor force increases”

Source, This Far by faith

“The Black Atlantic explores the truly global experiences that created the African American people. Beginning a full century before the first documented “20-and-odd” slaves arrived at Jamestown, Virginia, the episode portrays the earliest Africans, both slave and free, who arrived on the North American shores. Soon afterwards, the Trans-Atlantic slave trade would become a vast empire connecting three continents. Through stories of individuals caught in its web, like a 10-year-old girl named Priscilla who was transported from Sierra Leone to South Carolina in the mid-18th century, we trace the emergence of plantation slavery in the American South. The late 18th century saw a global explosion of freedom movements, and The Black Atlantic examines what that Era of Revolutions—American, French and Haitian—would mean for African Americans, and for slavery in America.”

Source, The Black Atlantic, episode one of The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., 

“In terms of African involvement, it is true also that Africans enslaved others before the coming and demands of the European. But three other facts must be added to this statement to give a holistic picture.. African enslavement was in no way like European enslavement. It was servitude which usually occurred “through conquest, capture in war or punishment for a crime” (Davidson, 1968:181). It could also resemble serfdom as in Medieval Europe where peasants were tied to the land and a lord for protection. They often lived as members of the family, married their masters daughters and rose to political and economic prominence and did not face the brutality and dehumanization which defined European chattel slavery.”

Source, Introduction to Black Studies, Ch. 4: The Holocaust of Enslavement