My Nora Experience (and applying advice)

Book One in The Nora White Story drops in just three days (depending on when you’re reading this). What a journey it has been. I now know what I want to do and what I definitely do not want to do with Book Two. The feedback has been amazing so far and I mean both positive and constructive. This project, in particular, is different than anything I’ve ever written for sure. I feel like The Stella Trilogy helped me to find my voice and now that I have grabbed hold of the vision, I can now continue on in that direction. For me personally, every new book feels new. Every time I sit down to write a story I am a new writer. I am venturing into a world that has not been visited before and I learn something new with every experience. This has not been more true than when writing this book.

One of the ways in which this book is different than the others is that I learned so much last year that I consciously set out to apply new things I’ve learned about what to do and what not to do. This has had both positive and negative results for me. There are some things I won’t do again (not even with Book Two) and some things I will do again. In many ways, ignorance is bliss. I found myself thinking back on days I knew less than I do today and how freeing it was. But knowledge holds responsibility so I could not do the same things with this book as I’d done with the others in areas where I now know better. An example of good advice I sought to apply is my new understanding of dialogue tags. I had no idea how important they were and am now ashamed of my other books lol. But like I said, every new book is new for me so my new book will always seem far better than my previous ones. I hope to sharpen my writing skills and to make every book better than the last. It is my hope that Book Two of Nora’s Story is better than Book One for instance. Where Book One falters, I hope Book Two excels.

Another, probably the most important, thing I’ve learned (and I’ll elaborate more on this at a later time) is that once you put all the writing advice into practice, you actually get to see what works for real and what doesn’t because the experience is the best teacher. I can get so frenzied sometimes until a tiny voice says, “Shh. You’re learning. If you had not done it and failed, you would not have known that it doesn’t work or that it does. Now you can share what you’ve learned with others.” It’s a completely different world than just reading about it. Once you actually do it, your eyes open up to new perspectives and ways of thought. When you actually publish the book and apply all this advice, you are able to better discern, through trial and error, what is worth holding onto and what is not. You’ll find that it’s a lot deeper than it seems on the surface but at the same time so worth it. You’ll make mistakes but you will see the world of publishing with new eyes once you actually do it. So, what are you waiting for? Nike said it best, “Just Do It”.

Renaissance releases Saturday.

Check out the latest review

courtesy of  Nadine Tomlinson on her website HERE.

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23 Tips from Famous Writers for New and Emerging Authors (5 min read) — Millionaire’s Digest

Great Author Tips from The Millionaires Digest as shared by Arrowhead Freelance and Publishing. I love 4, 11, 12, and 18.

Arrowhead Freelance and Publishing

Written by Millionaire’s Digest Staff Member: Amber M.

Founder & Owner of:A Not So Jaded Life

Millionaire’s Digest Staff Team, Author, Successful Living and Writing Writer


1. “I have advice for people who want to write. I don’t care whether they’re 5 or 500. There are three things that are important: First, if you want to write, you need to keep an honest, unpublishable journal that nobody reads, nobody but you. Where you just put down what you think about life, what you think about things, what you think is fair and what you think is unfair. And second, you need to read. You can’t be a writer if you’re not a reader. It’s the great writers who teach us how to write. The third thing is to write. Just write a little bit every day. Even if it’s for only half an hour — write, write, write.” ― Madeleine L’Engle

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My Advice for New Writers by John W. Howell

Great advice for both new and established writers. Post Quote: “Reality 1. Readers have no idea who you are. You need to market yourself and your books. You need to understand social media, marketing, selling, and general good business practices.”

Mystery Thriller Week

Your book

I was at a book signing the other day, and a person asked me a question that caused me to have to think a little before blurting out an answer. The question was, “What should every new writer know?” My answer at the time seemed to satisfy the person asking but after giving it a little more thought I decided that my reply was at best adequate and at worst incomplete. Now thanks to the Mystery Thriller Week I have been given another opportunity to adequately express what I have no come to call My Advice for New Writers that Every New Writer Should Know Before Deciding to Become a Writer. I think you can tell from my title that the thought process has grown from my initial response at the book signing. Also, if you have decided to become a writer no matter what anyone tells you, I would…

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13 Weeks: 13 Quick Blogging Tips: Week 1 – The Search Bar

Blog tips from Hugh. Does your blog have a search bar?

Hugh's Views & News

Welcome to another new feature for 2017 here on Hugh’s Views And News.

13 Weeks: 13 Quick Blogging Tips

The other day, I was writing a new blog post and wanted to include some links to some blog posts I had read on other blogs. However, try as I might, I wasn’t able to find one of the posts I wanted to link to and there was no search bar on the blog concerned. It wasn’t long before I gave up looking for the blog post.

Something most bloggers crave is that their blog posts are shared. You can make it very easy for readers to find what they may be looking for on your blog by including a search bar. WordPress have a ‘search’ widget, and here’s where to find it and how to install it on your WordPress blog.

Click on My Sites (located in the top left hand corner of your blog).

Click…

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Friday Roundup – 13 January

Stevie’s weekly roundups are great. Be sure to check in each week and see what goodies are there ☺.

Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

1. Chuck Sambuchino gives 38 query letter tips:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/pubtips-query

2.  Writer’s Digest tells us of 2 literary agents seeking submissions:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-rock-pascocello-glass-literary?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=wds-csa-nl-161228&utm_content=908716_GLA161228&utm_medium=email

3.  Are you writing a thriller?  Publisher Bloodhound Books are looking for submissions:

Bloodhound Books open for submissions!

4.  Colin Dunbar asks ‘Is it possible to publish a book for free?’

https://thecompleteselfpublisher.com/publish-book-for-free/

5. Gordon Long at Indies Unlimited says ‘Design your book to sell’:

http://www.indiesunlimited.com/2017/01/09/design-your-book-to-sell/#more-70153

6. Written Word Media gives us the top 10 trends in publishing that every author needs to know:

https://www.writtenwordmedia.com/2017/01/04/top-ten-trends-in-publishing-every-author-needs-to-know-in-2017/

7.  Blonde Write More gives us 10 things her creative friends have taught her about blogging (I especially like the one that begins ‘If you aren’t in the arena…’):

10 Things My Creative Friends Have Taught Me #Monday Blogs #BloggingGals #AmWriting

8.  Andrew Joyce introduces Sunrise Editing Services via Chris, the Story Reading Ape’s blog:

Introducing: Sunrise Editing Services…

9.  Thanks to Rachel Poli for these Jan/Feb writing…

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Revision and Technique

Excellent advice on Revisions and Technique.

MDellert-dot-Com

Before beginning a revision project, it’s important to consider several technical matters. Just as important is to keep in mind that these aren’t rules, but principles that will encourage you to make informed choices about your work. For every suggestion or example, there are exceptions, and nothing here should taken as carved in stone.

Show, Don’t Tell

Keep Calm and Start RevisionWe’ve all heard this before. But keep in mind that this is NOT an imperative so much as a warning. There is a time and a place for telling, and in fact, situations in which it is preferable or even necessary to tell the events rather than show them. Not every piece of information in your story needs the same level of attention and importance. But which is which, and how do you know?

Telling is a summary of events, as if they are merely being reported. This can create distance between your…

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Guest Blogging for Authors:  How NOT to Query a Blogger… 

Informative article on how to query a blogger for guest posts (Book Reviews and Interviews as well).

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How To Ebook

Guest Blogging for Authors: How NOT to Query a Blogger…and 10 Tips for Doing it Right

Want to land a guest blogging gig? Don’t clown around.

by Anne R. Allen

Marketing gurus will tell you guest blogging is one of the best ways to get your name out there to sell books and/or writing services. And they’re right.Here are some reasons why.

Read more

But the gurus don’t often tell you how to land guest spots. Or how to find the best ones to reach your readers

http://annerallen.com/guest-blogging-how-to-query-a-blogger/

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