Introduce Yourself: Introducing Guest Author Khaya Ronkainen

Today, I’d like to welcome Khaya Ronkainen. Welcome to The PBS Blog! Let’s get started.


What is your name and where are you from?

My name is Khaya Ronkainen. I was born and bred in South Africa, and I now call Finland my second home.

South Africa in the houusee. What was your childhood dream?

To become a teacher. I have huge respect for teachers. I talk this, and also the reasons why I never took up the occupation after all, in the “About” page of my site.

Nice. We’ll be sure to link that below. In your own words, what is humility?

Humility is not a low opinion of one’s self but an awareness that there’s always room for improvement, even if one is confident in their abilities and skills/talents.

Absolutely agree. Who’s your favorite Historical figure?

Nelson Mandela, because he gave me a voice. Most people are aware of apartheid system and its laws that prohibited many things in South Africa. For those who do not know what apartheid is, I suggest a read that sheds some light on the nature of racial injustices at the time, Cry the Beloved Country by Alan Paton, a South African author. I read somewhere that if one wants to understand a country, they must read its authors. So I hope you’re inspired to pick up the book if you’ve never read it.

Awesome. What is the most thought provoking book you’ve ever read?

Animal Farm by George Orwell. It’s the first influential book I read that showed me the power of a written word, and opened up a whole new world. I have to thank my English teacher, Mrs. Roos, during my high school years. She knew how to activate young minds and keep them engaged through literature.

Available now on Amazon

Loved Orwell’s 1984. What’s the most difficult thing about being a writer?

It’s often difficult for me to describe what I do to people who don’t write or create in any other form. Because what I do, writing, largely depends on an exaggerated inspiration or the elusive muse that holds me hostage, but with no promise of real money.

The most exciting thing?

Dreaming stories into being, that is, the gift of imagination.

You said, there’s no promise of real money in writing. With Indie Publishing being as successful as it is these days, do you think that’s changing? In what way can we improve how writers are paid?

Certainly, there’s no denying the success and benefits of indie publishing; total creative control, higher royalties, supportive indie communities, and so on. More importantly, indie books are doing well as traditionally published books, when it comes to e-publishing, in some genres.

When I talk about no promise of real money, I’m not speaking for all writers but my own writing, which is mostly poetry. Let’s face it, poetry is a difficult genre to sell. My observation is that people love poetry or at least, the idea of poetry, but are not so eager to buy poetry books.

We also know that no one goes into poetry for money. Poets still have to hustle and take regular jobs in order to earn a living. So, perhaps, I’ll rephrase your question, “In what way can we improve how writers are paid?” with “How can we support poets, as readers, and stop undervaluing their work by expecting to get it for free?

As you can see, I’m passionate about this topic. But I’ll stop here.

No, keep going! I love the passion and you are absolutely right. While no one should “poet” for money, no one should do anything else for money! You shouldn’t embrace any path for money specifically and yet we must eat. Looking at it this way, why is poetry or writing…why is Art in general, not expected to be profitable? Something to think about.

I suppose I don’t have to ask what genre you write in…

Poetry, because I like its brevity and the immediacy it creates. Fiction (semi-autobiographical works) because I like to blur the line between fact and fiction. I’m also a horror genre “visiting writer.” As a matter of fact, I’ve recently published my second poetry chapbook, a small collection of dark poetry.

Available now on Amazon

Outside of writing, what are some of your passions?

Nature is my playground and a playmate, my husband. Seriously, I do all sorts of outdoor activities, and I draw huge inspiration from nature.

I can see that about you! Beautiful. What would be the most amazing adventure to go on?

Taking a sabbatical in order to go backpacking through Asia.

Thank you Khaya for spending this time with us. We enjoyed you!


Copyright ©2019. Khaya Ronkainen. photo used with permission.

Bio

Khaya Ronkainen is an independent author, writer, poet, public speaker and many other things. She currently lives in Finland with her husband.

Her work often examines duality of an immigrant life, cultural identity, relations among immigrants, and nature. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks, Seasons Defined and From the Depths of Darkness, both available at Amazon Kindle.

She is currently at work on her debut novel about growing up in South Africa during apartheid era. Learn more about the writer and her work or connect via her blog at www.khayaronkainen.fi.

You can also find/connect with Khaya at:

Amazon Author Central: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B07DGT7683

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/khaya.ronkainen/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18097702.Khaya_Ronkainen

Blog: http://www.khayaronkainen.fi/


Are you an author? Looking for more exposure? Learn more about my Introduce Yourself Feature HERE. 

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Introduce Yourself: Introducing Guest Author Mamello Mosiana

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Today I’d like to extend a warm welcome to Mamello Mosiana. Welcome to The PBS Blog! Let’s get started.


What is your name and where are you from?

My name is Mamello Mosiana, I am from South Africa, originally from Bloemfontein, but I spent most of my adulthood in Cape Town.

South Africa in the house! What would your perfect writing / reading room look like?

My perfect writing/reading room would have large windows that almost take up the entire side of one wall, outside that window would be an overgrown garden. The room itself would also feel like a garden, filled with pot plants and flower pots. In the corner of the room instead of a desk would be a large cushiony futon, where I would work, since I find it hard to write at a desk. On the other side of the room, overlooking the window would be a meditation space enveloped in a circle of fragrant candles. The room would also have a light whiff of incense whipping through the air.

Nice. What would be the most amazing adventure to go on?

Personally, the most amazing adventure for me would be to travel by myself around the world, with nothing but one small backpack. Since I have difficulty letting go of stuff and packing light, the adventure, would probably begin with me, just trying to decide what will go into the bag.

Lol. What songs have you completely memorized?

I am a big Bob Marley fan, so I have mostly memorised his music, more by repetitive listening than any true attempts to memorise his lyrics. My favourites are: “Redemption Song”, “Concrete Jungle”, “Corner Stone”, “No Water”, “Stir It Up”, “Crazy Baldheads” and “Kaya”.

I LOVE Redemption Song! Does blogging help you to write?

Yes, blogging does help me to write, I have learnt a lot about writing succinctly and moreover, blogging has taught me a lot about myself. Since in my academic writing I am prone to distance myself from my subjects, blogging has really allowed me to interrogate what makes me, me. It is also through blogging, that I found my writing style.

Let’s switch it up a bit. What’s family life like for you, single or married?

Yes, I am single, at this point willingly taking a break from romantic relationships. I do not think I would like to be married, ever since I was a child, I have found I always preferred my own company. Even in relationships, I have found that I often seek out my own space.

Mamello, what takes up too much of your time?

Day-dreaming. I spend half my day just daydreaming, while it helps with the creative process, it also means that I sometimes miss the things going on around me and have little time for the things I have to do.

Are you political?

Yes, I am political. I do not believe that anyone is truly apolitical. Our personal life choices, though they might seem like minutiae have political, economic and societal impacts. Most of those life choices, have been pre-empted by politicians, or are regulated by policy-making spaces. “The personal is political, and the political is personal”.

Why is writing important to you?

Writing helps me process a lot of my feelings. I have found that it has helped me heal parts of myself that I did not know needed healing. Writing also helps me make sense of the world around and has given me a safe space to vent, cry and process.

What’s your favorite food?

My favourite food is hot chicken wings. If hot wings are on a menu, I am ordering them! I am in an endless pursuit to find the hottest and thus best chicken wings.

You making me hungry over here!

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Thank you Mamello for spending this time with us. We enjoyed you!


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Bio.

Mamello Mosiana, is a second-time Masters student, blogger and in the process of writing her first collection of poems. Mamello is from Cape Town, South Africa, however she currently lives in London, England. She has worked in the field of Transitional Justice and Conflict Resolution. She is passionate about the redress of Gender-based violence and racial inequality in South Africa. Mamello would describe herself as a black radical feminist and consummate day-dreamer.

The Afroist Blog:  https://theafroist.wordpress.com/

Instagram: (handles @theafroistblog/ @afrotudist)

https://www.instagram.com/theafroistblog/

https://www.instagram.com/afrotudist/

Twitter: Handle (@theafroistblog)

https://twitter.com/TheAfroistBlog

Are you an author? Looking for more exposure? Learn more about my Introduce Yourself Feature HERE!

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Nelson Mandela

Is it Wednesday? Indeed it is and that means another episode of Silver Threading’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday. I am so excited to be back! For those of you keeping in touch you know I took December off so I have not done a WQW since November! Soooo what better way to resurface than the first WQW of the year.

Let’s get started. Today’s quote is from Nelson Mandela:

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I truly believe that how you treat others play a big part in the life that you live. More than our individual goals and ambitions is how we are wiling to share pieces of ourselves with others that will truly determine the kind of people we are. If we have fed the hungry, encouraged the lowly, or given a kind word to the sick. In short, if we have loved. If we have looked out for others the same as we would look out for ourselves. After the sun slumbers and the dust settles, this is most important. Not so much how important you are, but how important you have made others. The light that you instill into their lives after the goals are realized and the dreams fulfilled. Did you keep what you’ve learned to yourself or did you share it? More so than share it, how much have you multiplied? At the end of the day my passion rest with providing for others to the extent of my ability. If I can change the life of one person with my books, my words, and the life that I live then I have done my job. I believe no earthly possession is more noble.

About the Author:

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Nelson Mandela, 1918 – 2013

South Africa’s first black President, Nelson Mandela was born Rolihlahla Mandela into the Madiba clan in the village of Mvezo, Transkei, South Africa on July 18, 1918. In 1930, when he was 12 years old, his father died. Hearing the elders’ stories of his ancestors’ valor during the wars of resistance, he dreamed also of making his own contribution to the freedom struggle of his people.

Born of royalty, the son of Chief Henry Mandela of the Madiba clan of the Xhosa-speaking Tembu people, Nelson Mandela renounced his claim to the chieftainship to become a lawyer. He attended South African Native College (later the University of Fort Hare) and studied law at the University of the Witwatersrand; he later passed the qualification exam to become a lawyer.

On May 10, 1994 Mandela was sworn in as president of the country’s first multiethnic government. He established in 1995 the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which investigated human rights violations under apartheid, and he introduced housing, education, and economic development initiatives designed to improve the living standards of the country’s black population.

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That’s it for this weeks segment of Writer’s Quote Wednesday. Be sure to check out the quotes from other blogger participants.

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S / O to South Africa!

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So yall know every now and again I check to see who stopped by the PBS Blog from across the water. I say every now and again because I try not to get too caught up in the stats every single time I post. I just don’t want to get distracted. I prefer to be lead naturally toward post ideas without the influence of how little or how great the views are. So I’ve organized my thoughts to take a look at them only enough to stay in tuned, to stay aware but not to depend on. So anyway, when I noticed more views from outside countries I did a blog series where I gave them a shout out. Only because other countries don’t get the same representation as America does. I decided then to shine some light on my viewers from across the water, those outside of the U.S. Make a long story short, I’m sitting here in the late hours drafting tomorrow morning’s post and decided to stroll on over to my stats. This is when I noticed I’ve received a total of 65 views from yesterday (7 / 30) from South Africa alone. Now yall know they deserve a shout out! I know some of you veterans out there are used to this but I’m really excited to have so many people from one place to support this blog and from Africa of all places is icing on the cake! I guess you can call it a milestone. I didn’t set out for this specifically, but I am always excited to reach as many people as I can. Even if their eyeballs slightly brushed upon the page its really cool to see just how many people viewed your blog and I want South Africa to know that I appreciate your support. I also appreciate everyone who supports this blog by sharing my posts, participating, commenting, and reading in silence.