Langston Hughes Documentary, ‘I, too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled’ to Explore His Life & Work – GOOD BLACK NEWS

Langston Hughes fans check it out! A documentary is on the horizon. Click through to the original article below. And for a fun, fictionalized sneak peek into the life of Langston based on real historical events, be sure to check out Renaissance: The Nora White Story book one, now just 99cents on Amazon.

https://goodblacknews.org/2018/06/12/langston-hughes-documentary-i-too-sing-america-langston-hughes-unfurled-to-explore-his-life-work/

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Special Announcement

Good day loves,

I’d just like a few minutes of your time. I am hosting two live events for those of you in or around GA:

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I am hosting a Double Book Signing and Community Meet and Greet Event on Friday, March 30, 2018 and I would love your support, those of you who can make it. Featured books will be Renaissance, I am Soul and The Stella Trilogy. If you don’t have these in paperback now is a good time to get them! (There will be limited copies of each so being on time is important.)

First Signing:
Nubian Bookstore
1540 Southlake Pkwy, Suite 7A
Morrow, GA 30062
12:00 – 2:00p EST

Second Signing:
The I-Lounge
2000 E Lake Pkwy
Marietta, GA 30062
3:00 – 6:00p EST

(includes light refreshments)

PLEASE NOTE: If you plan on coming to town anytime before Friday, 3/30, please let me know ASAP so that we can accommodate you. Also if you’re in ATL and you would like physical copies of the flyer I’ll be at the bookstore this weekend to drop some off.

Why Renaissance: The Nora White Story by Yecheilyah Ysrayl is a Must Buy!

Thanks so much for the love.

Readers, don’t forget to pick up your copy for just 99cents in eBook from now through Wed., 8/23 on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073J3FMYF

TizzyMatic

Ever read a book that you could completely or almost completely relate to?

Made you feel like it was made specifically for you, right? This book did that for the first time in my life and I’m grateful and happy that I had the chance to read it. 

Saying this is a must buy isn’t a stretch – it’s not just cause I can relate to it. It’s the knowledge you gain instead. 

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*No way you can’t know him*

View original post 670 more words

Renaissance is $0.99 for a Limited Time!

As you all know, I am preparing to go away from the online scene for awhile. Before I do I am running an eBook sale on Renaissance for any of you who’ve been waiting to get your hands on it. From now through Wednesday, August 23rd you can get it for the low price of 99cents.

About.

When seventeen-year-old Nora White successfully graduates High School in 1922 Mississippi and is College bound, everyone is overjoyed and excited. Everyone except Nora. She dreams of Harlem, Cotton Clubs, Fancy Dresses, and Langston Hughes. For years, she’s sat under Mr. Oak, the big oak tree on the plush green grass of her families five acres, and daydreamed of The Black Mecca.

The ambitious, young Nora is fascinated by the prospect of being a famous writer in The Harlem Renaissance and decides she doesn’t want to go to College. Despite her parent’s staunch protest, Nora finds herself in Jacobsville, New York, a small town forty-five minutes outside of Harlem.

Shocked by their daughter’s disappearance, Gideon and Molly White are plagued with visions of the deadly south, like the brutal lynching of Gideon’s sister years ago. As the couple embark on a frightening and gut wrenching search for Nora, they are each stalked by their own traumatic past. Meanwhile, Nora learns that the North is not all it’s cracked up to be.

Can Gideon and Molly overcome their disturbing past in time to find their daughter before it’s too late?

From the most recent review:

“I’ve never felt more at home when reading a book until I read this. It felt like I was in history class, but I actually learned history. You know what I mean? A teenage girl aspiring to become a writer during the time of the Harlem Renaissance – that’s literally what’s going on. Within that, there’s life. Life of her, life of her parents, life of people around her. I have to say that this is my first time reading something that I had a COMPLETE grasp on. I understood everything from how they spoke to how they thought. Very impressive in my opinion. I don’t only recommend this, I think this is something that can be read in class.” – Amazon Customer Review

GET IT HERE

Renaissance: The Nora White Story (Book One)

This book is 99cents for a LIMITED TIME ONLY. Click Here to Buy Now.

Black History Fun Fact Friday – Nora Holt

Did you know there was a woman writer during the Harlem Renaissance named Nora? Yup.

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One of the things I wanted to do with The Nora White Story project is to make everything make as much sense as possible. I know how important it is that everything fits the era to include names. Thus, I used names that were familiar with the time. Some of the names, like Nora, jumped out at me from the start. However, some of them were not so easy. To make sure everyone’s name (even minor characters) fit the time, I Googled the census data for popular names of the 1920s and scrolled through male and female names. So, who was Nora Holt?

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Nora Holt

Nora was a singer, composer and music critic. Born Lena Douglas in Kansas City, Kansas; Nora graduated from Western University of Quindaro, Kansas and later earned a Bachelor’s degree in music in 1917. In 1918, she earned her Master’s Degree in music at Chicago Musical College, becoming one of the first African-American women to complete a Master’s program in the United States. Her thesis composition was an orchestral work called Rhapsody on Negro Themes.

Nora was married quite a few times. On the fourth time, she changed her name from Lena to Nora when she married George Holt in 1916.

From 1917-1921 Nora contributed music criticism pieces to the Chicago Defender, a black daily newspaper. In 1919, she co-founded the National Association of Negro Musicians and then spent 12 years abroad in Europe and Asia singing at night clubs and private parties. Although composing over 200 works of orchestral music, one of the reasons Nora Holt is not well known is because her work was stolen. Upon leaving for Europe in 1926, she placed her manuscripts in storage when she returned they were gone. Only one piece survived because it was published prior to the theft and is called Negro Dance, (ragtime-based piano piece).

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Nora

Holt moved to Harlem in the early 1920s, where she became an important part of the Harlem Renaissance. She became good friends with novelist and critic Carl Van Vechten.

(You can meet some of these historical figures when they make special guest appearances in my new novel, Renaissance: The Nora White Story which releases tomorrow. Today (7/14) is the last day to get it at the reduced price of $1.99)

Nora was also a teacher. She studied music at the University of Southern California in the 1930s and went on to teach music in Los Angeles for several years. Nora was well rounded. Not only was she a writer and musician but she also ran a beauty shop. Apparently Nora knew how important it was to stay fly :-).

In 1943, Holt took a position as an editor and music critic with a black-oriented publication Amsterdam News and went on to live a full life. During the early 1950s and early 1960s, she hosted a radio concert series called “Nora Holt’s Concert Showcase”. It ran to 1964 and in 1966, she was a member of the First World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar, Senegal.

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Photo of Nora Holt, taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1955

Nora Holt died January 25, 1974, in Los Angeles.


 

My Nora Experience (and applying advice)

Book One in The Nora White Story drops in just three days (depending on when you’re reading this). What a journey it has been. I now know what I want to do and what I definitely do not want to do with Book Two. The feedback has been amazing so far and I mean both positive and constructive. This project, in particular, is different than anything I’ve ever written for sure. I feel like The Stella Trilogy helped me to find my voice and now that I have grabbed hold of the vision, I can now continue on in that direction. For me personally, every new book feels new. Every time I sit down to write a story I am a new writer. I am venturing into a world that has not been visited before and I learn something new with every experience. This has not been more true than when writing this book.

One of the ways in which this book is different than the others is that I learned so much last year that I consciously set out to apply new things I’ve learned about what to do and what not to do. This has had both positive and negative results for me. There are some things I won’t do again (not even with Book Two) and some things I will do again. In many ways, ignorance is bliss. I found myself thinking back on days I knew less than I do today and how freeing it was. But knowledge holds responsibility so I could not do the same things with this book as I’d done with the others in areas where I now know better. An example of good advice I sought to apply is my new understanding of dialogue tags. I had no idea how important they were and am now ashamed of my other books lol. But like I said, every new book is new for me so my new book will always seem far better than my previous ones. I hope to sharpen my writing skills and to make every book better than the last. It is my hope that Book Two of Nora’s Story is better than Book One for instance. Where Book One falters, I hope Book Two excels.

Another, probably the most important, thing I’ve learned (and I’ll elaborate more on this at a later time) is that once you put all the writing advice into practice, you actually get to see what works for real and what doesn’t because the experience is the best teacher. I can get so frenzied sometimes until a tiny voice says, “Shh. You’re learning. If you had not done it and failed, you would not have known that it doesn’t work or that it does. Now you can share what you’ve learned with others.” It’s a completely different world than just reading about it. Once you actually do it, your eyes open up to new perspectives and ways of thought. When you actually publish the book and apply all this advice, you are able to better discern, through trial and error, what is worth holding onto and what is not. You’ll find that it’s a lot deeper than it seems on the surface but at the same time so worth it. You’ll make mistakes but you will see the world of publishing with new eyes once you actually do it. So, what are you waiting for? Nike said it best, “Just Do It”.

Renaissance releases Saturday.

Check out the latest review

courtesy of  Nadine Tomlinson on her website HERE.