Race and Rights

Malcolm-X-about-men

When did race and rights become separate entities? Since when has the black problem in America not have to do with both race and rights? Dare you to walk the streets of the 1920s and 40s and 50s with your prophet scented blood and expect to transgress the law of separatist signage. That “Whites Only” sign ain’t there by mistake. The one that says Negroes like you must order from the back door. Yo money may be colored like your skin but green has always been worth more than brown. I don’t like to have to go back to slavery. After all, it ain’t like I lived it and yet I can never forget what it feels like. But since we on the subject of feeling, I’m feeling like the same blood pulsing underneath my ancestor’s skin now pulses through mine so what they felt I feel it too. Perhaps I too was a slave long ago and its just taken me this long to find my voice. So, therefore, let me tell you something about what it means to be a slave. A slave is never granted the same rights as a free man, not a physical slave or a psychological one. An inferior race is never granted the same rights as a superior one. Thus anything that’s got to do with rights has also got to do with race. For the Black problem in America has always been centered around identity and always will be. Rights would have never been a problem if the problem wasn’t race. If the hierarchy of the superior and the less superior didn’t exist. If black people never walked around with bywords and proverbs tattooed on their skins there wouldn’t have been a need for them to watch movies in the Nigger Heaven1 of southern movie theaters. Would have been no need of me taking my seat alongside Miss Parks or Miss Morgan all them years ago. A Black Man’s rights and his race are always connected here, like the careful structure of his bones before he emerges from his mother’s womb. It’s the yearning for freedom written in his DNA. Black America’s rights have always and always will be centered around their identity because their problem is not physical it is spiritual. And because a spiritual problem has been long fought with physical weapons the condition of black people in America continues. And so their fight has always been and always will be centered around their freedom.

1. Nigger heaven, n. a designated place, usually the balcony, where blacks were forced to sit, for example, in an integrated movie theater or church as part of Jim Crow Laws.

Advertisements

Inspiration and Copyright Infringement – How Fine Is The Line?

Wow. This is too close for comfort. I’d be devastated. #ThouShallNotSteal

There are, arguably, seven basic plots. I won’t list them here, but you can find them if you click this link: The Seven Basic Plots: Why We Tell Stories by Christopher Booker. All seven can be said to result from real life inspiration. While fiction can take these inspirations to incredible heights, the ideas begin from somewhere.

So we have inspiration, yes?

It was brought to my attention this morning that there has been a lawsuit taken up by Sherrilyn Kenyon, bestselling author of the Dark-Hunter paranormal romance series, accusing Cassandra Clare, bestselling author of Mortal Instruments and the Shadowhunter series, of copyright infringement. (Read the article here: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/10/sherrilyn-kenyon-sues-cassandra-clare-for-wilfully-copying-her-novels )

In this particular case, it seems to me a clear case of copying: if you read the exhibit (click here) given in the lawsuit, the infinite monkey theorem comes to mind as the only other possible explanation, particularly when…

View original post 324 more words

Self-Publishing: Why I Bought My Own ISBN Number

20180131_132622

This post has been updated.


I am NOT going to get into the whole debate about whether you should or shouldn’t purchase your own ISBN. I am not going to get into it because what I’ve learned is that it depends on each individual’s vision for his or her book. Everyone is different and to say that someone is foolish for spending THEIR money on an ISBN or not isn’t fair. Some can’t get around why others would pay for something they can get for free and some can’t get around why someone won’t pay for one. The answer is simple.

A Createspace, for example (or Lulu) issued free ISBN lists Createspace or Lulu as the publisher. If you purchase your own ISBN, you are listed as the publisher. It will have your name or your company name, whichever you want. In the images below you see the difference. My Stella Books were published with a Free Lulu ISBN (all except for Book 3). Renaissance was published with my own ISBN:

 

Not everyone wants Createspace, Lulu, etc as the publisher of their books. It’s simply a matter of preference and each author’s goal for his or her books. It may not mean much to have Createspace as your publisher but it may mean a lot to someone else. So let’s stop stoning each other. If people want Free ISBNs let them have it and if people want to invest THEIR money into an ISBN, let them have it.

Now that we got that out the way, here is why I decided to invest in my own ISBN numbers.

What is an ISBN Number?

ISBN is short for International Standard Book Number and it is your book’s identity and proof of existence.

The ISBN numbering system is used worldwide and publishers around the globe identify their work in this standardized format. Owning your ISBNs also means controlling the book metadata that goes with it. According to Google and Ingram Spark, the book’s Metadata includes your book’s title, publication date, format, BISAC category you assign to it and more. The BISAC category, according to Ingram Spark, “is intended to guide shelving, categorization, merchandising, and marketing efforts. BISAC codes help signal to potential buyers, retailers, distributors, and search engines what your book is about – the primary genre(s), topic(s), and theme(s) that matter in regards to your book. Without these codes, readers and those within the industry cannot identify what your book is about or if they’d like to stock or read it.”

I purchased my own  ISBN for ownership and control of the associated metadata attached to the book. I love being listed as the publisher (me or my company) because it looks more professional. Createspace insists that you are the owner of your book even if you use their free ISBN. The only problem with this is that the language is a confusing  (to me) and may not mean anything right now, but can have bigger implications later based on the success of this book. It is my understanding that CreateSpace provides ISBN’s free to people using its service, but it owns those numbers and the associated metadata. My question is, if you don’t own the ISBN and metadata, how do you own the book? Just a thought.

I buy my own ISBN Numbers whenever I can afford them and when I can’t afford them I use Createspace. In the future, I’d like to purchase ISBNs for ALL of my books. I want to do this for the potential for my books to reach new heights. It’s not really about right now for me, it’s about the future.

It boils down to one basic understanding:

If an Independent Publisher wants to be identified as the publisher, the Indie must purchase their own ISBN and contrary to popular opinion, this is not a waste of money.  Right now it may not mean much but I want to ensure that when the time comes, I can maximize my opportunities. As an Independent Publisher with my own ISBN, I can publish under my company name, I can go to a different printer if I choose, I can open my own account with major companies and opt for national trade distribution, and I can even create my own team of publishing experts. I know that with the vision I have for my work, I have to think beyond today so the ISBN is worth incorporating into my book budget.


Yecheilyah (e-see-lee-yah) is an Author, Blogger, and Poet of ten published works. Renaissance: The Nora White Story (Book One) is her latest novel and is available now on Amazon.com.

You Have the Right to Write

Attention: You Have the Right to Write or anything you don’t say will drive you crazy by intense desire. Creative ideas will overheat until they melt themselves into fragmented descriptions of confused thought and drip like perspiration from your brow. Words will escape your mouth in an explosion of writer’s language. Soon, you’ll start bringing up the names of books to four year olds and correcting sentences fresh out your neighbors mouth, “..not a eraser, an eraser..” you’ll blurt out uncontrollably. Your lips are so bone dry they have wrinkles, and you trip over your tongue as if it does not belong in your mouth. You can’t even blame Writer’s Block for the frustration since you keep missing your periods at the end of sentences. Poor words, left to run on in a string of thought; breathlessly pulsating through veins hoping to make it to the end of your never ending consciousness. The least you can do is appoint a capital letter to keep everyone in check, a comma won’t hurt you either. If you find yourself in this condition, you have the WRITE to consult inspiration before speaking anything into existence, and to have a pen and pad ready for any glint of light amidst the darkness, now or in the future.

His crime? Not Writing!
His crime? Not Writing!