6 Reasons the Black Panther Movie is Popular (and it’s not even out yet)

Black Cast

  • 90% of the cast members are Black. This isn’t a racial thing. It’s just that people are tired of seeing movies where the heroes are white. Even biblical movies refuse to reflect the real identity of the people who lived in that time. The Samson movie is also about to come out but Samson was not white. It’s not about skin complexion it’s just a fact, the people of the Bible were Black.

Warriors, Not Slaves

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  • The Black people in the movie are not slaves, maids, housekeepers, and farmers (though there’s nothing wrong with farming, just saying). The Black people in this movie are warriors, Kings, and Queens.

Women Warriors

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  • The Panther women go just as hard as the men without losing their femininity. They are supportive of their men, smart, fierce and they are fighters. Not to mention a showcase of the women’s natural beauty. I love how (far as the trailers go since the movie is not out yet) the movie shows them being beautiful while swinging those swords.

Historical

  • The Panther’s first appearance happened during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and I am sure the newscasts that showed Black Americans getting brutalized by police was a motivator for Marvel. This movie Black Panther comes at a  sensitive time politically which further makes it reminiscent of revolutionary movements in Black History such as Huey Newton’s Black Panther Party For Self-Defense and Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association, both of which promoted the freedom of the so-called Black people.

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Educational

  • Speaking of history, Black Panther is educational for today’s youth, many of whom know nothing of the Black Panthers of the 60s, Marcus Garvey of the 20s or anyone of or before the era. The release of this movie at this time, therefore, makes it easier to start conversations about Black History (especially being it releases February) and inspires liberation among Black people in general. The men and women even have accents reflective of their “African” heritage. When you’ve spent nearly 400 years being afflicted and not seeing positive representations of yourself in textbooks, on television, in schools etc., it makes it difficult to have a positive image of yourself as an individual. My hope is that Black Panther delivers and helps to spark a resurgence of consciousness among Black youth.

Empowering

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  • Wakanda is empowering and reminiscent of the Israelite nation (not a race of Blacks but a nation of people) and their position as rulers. It represents everything we could be if we embrace who we truly are. This movie, if done right, is not just a movie, it is a biblically powerful representation of Israel on the top and not the bottom for once. The birth of a nation and the rise of a people. It is our time.

About Black Panther

After the death of his father, T’Challa returns home to the African nation of Wakanda to take his rightful place as king. When a powerful enemy suddenly reappears, T’Challa’s mettle as king — and as Black Panther — gets tested when he’s drawn into a conflict that puts the fate of Wakanda and the entire world at risk. Faced with treachery and danger, the young king must rally his allies and release the full power of Black Panther to defeat his foes and secure the safety of his people.

Yecheilyah is an author, blogger and poet. Be sure to pick up your copy of I am Soul, her latest collection of poetry on Amazon.

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15 thoughts on “6 Reasons the Black Panther Movie is Popular (and it’s not even out yet)

  1. Marvel comics are going through one of their ‘Let’s destroy everything built up and market despair for a while’ episodes.
    However back a few years ago Black Panther was one of the giants in the Marvel Pantheon; skilled warrior, statesman and powerful intellect, much respected by other heroes. He was married to the equally majestic Storm of the X-Men, but as I said Marvel just decided to pull all its heroes down and apart, so that sadly is over.
    Looking forward to the film.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’m just thankful it is going to empower. That’s what impresses me more about any movie. What can I take across the threshold besides accidental popcorn butter stains? I also like Marvel Comic anything. This movie will indeed be special. Go head Black Panther!!!

    Liked by 2 people

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  4. I have to come back to this post because there is a series Netflix put out on another Marvel Character… Luke Cage. This is set in Harlem; Luke’s backstory is of a man serving time in a brutal prison, who volunteers for experiments, and develops super-powers; a very tough skin and great strength. He returns to Harlem to try and ‘do the right’ thing, in a pacific way but is drawn into fighting. The cast is black. The characters are multi-dimensional, even the villains, brilliant performances all round.
    One of the most electric scenes for me, bearing in mind I am from the 1950s, was to see four black women actors in a tense police station scene- One investigating Officer, her superior, the mother of an accused and her representative and I’m thinking back to 1960s TV and bowled over how much progress has been made; I guess there is still a very long way to go, but that series and that scene is going to stay with me forever (Along with the ‘Give ’em Hell 54th!’ out of the film ‘Glory’.
    OK, I’m done; just had to say all that.
    Best wishes.
    Roger

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent article! I’ve had Black Panther in my comic collection sicne the 70s. But as groundbreaking as it is, there were WAY too many pulling the “Blade did it first!” card on forums and fan sites I visited. This is the kind of article I can show them to shurt down that noise.
    I also did a witeup myself addressing that specific issue of “he’s not the first”:
    https://beardedcoffeemonkey.com/why-is-black-panther-important/

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Misrepresentation | The PBS Blog

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