Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews – Homeschool Happily: Yes, You Can by Laura Kronen

Title: Homeschool Happily: Yes, You Can
Author: Laura Kronen
Print Length: 209 Pages
Publisher: Be You Only Better
Publication Date: July 4, 2020


I have been an advocate for Home School since 2009, when my husband and I moved to Louisiana from Chicago, and our friends moved with us. They had decided they would Homeschool their children, and we agreed to help. At this time, I had not started teaching professionally (that would happen later), so I had no idea what I was doing, and I was nervous about being in such an important position.

At 21 years old, I was not fully aware of the magnitude of what I had agreed to do. We were responsible now for shaping young minds. What we taught and did not teach could have a massive impact on how these children would understand the world. So began my journey of researching the American Educational System. First, to find resources for the various subjects and understand how lesson plans and curricula were to be done and then to understand the American Educational Institution as a whole.

The information I found, the connections to psychology, the racist roots, the outcome-based education, the truth about Common Core, the absence of life skills, and the dumbing down of our children, would forever leave an impression on me. From then on, I would do more research until my husband and I eventually put together a lecture presentation where we traveled from city to city teaching parents about the benefits of a Home Schooled Education. We also managed a community center in Shreveport’s inner-city (before moving to Georgia) for five years, where we tutored children of all ages.

Homeschool Happily is more than a guide that teaches parents and professionals about the many benefits of Homeschooling. The author’s down-to-earth persona made me feel like I was sitting at her kitchen table, listening to her talk about this journey. I could see her showing me the outlines for the skills and concepts for each subject. Usually, I am not a fan of forwards when it comes to non-fiction (get to the point already), but this was a good one. The author begins with a substantial breakdown of the difference between Quarantine Schooling Pandemic Crisis Schooling and Homeschooling, which are not the same things.

I found this exceptionally important because we are now amid a global pandemic where parents are forced to experience, at least in part, what it is like to Homeschool their children. Many parents think the day needs to mimic a traditional public school, but Homeschooling does not require six-eight hours a day. Parents can finish Pre-K – Kindergarten classes in an hour or two. Older grades (1st – 5th) can be done by lunch, depending on how early you start. (*1) Junior High and High School classes will take longer, but no study has to last all day.

Homeschool Happily made me happy to read it because it was easy to understand (no unnecessary five-dollar words to get the point across).  The author talks about why someone may choose to Homeschool, such as flexibility, travel, religious reasons, politics, vaccination exemption, avoiding racism, high-quality education, and more. She dismantles the stereotypes surrounding a Homeschooled education with common sense breakdowns and tips on structuring curriculum and managing a Homeschooled budget. (This was a great breakdown. Most people don’t think of a budget when it comes to Homeschool.)

As someone already on the Homeschool bandwagon, I enjoyed the resources and educational tools, tips on managing the subjects for your children, and the advice on standardized testing and AP exams the most. It provided not only a what but also how. I think staying on top of testing is so important. Because Homeschool is still looked at as taboo, parents might want to keep these kinds of records. (*2)

I did not need to be convinced that Homeschooling can provide high-quality education. Still, for someone who is not yet sure about Homeschooling and how it differs from traditional schooling, what it is, and how it is done, this is the perfect manual for that parent or professional. I would even recommend purchasing the paperback so you can highlight and take notes.

*1 – *Homeschool gives children the chance to get more sleep. Think about it: Why is it that small children who wake up early start their school day later, close to nap time? And why is it that teenagers with raging hormones, body changes, and hours of homework from the night previous and who sleep later start the school day earlier?

Homeschooling gives parents a chance to regulate things like this, so children aren’t sleep deprived. The author notes that Homeschooled children get 90 minutes more sleep per night than non-homeschooled children. (This doesn’t mean kids should be allowed to sleep all day). 

*2 – I am not saying that state testing is the model for measuring intelligence. I am saying it is a good idea to see how your children are progressing as Homeschoolers if you need to provide paperwork to prove your Homeschool program’s authenticity to state/government officials.

Additionally, to be prepared in case your child(ren) will want to pursue a college education, and finally, for your own peace of mind. Homeschooling provides a High-Quality Education. But if your child(ren) aren’t scoring at grade level compared to traditional public school students, then you will know to take a better look at your program or process to find out why or even to decide if Homeschooling is right for your family.

Strong Introduction: 5/5

Authenticity / Believable: 5/5

Organization: 5/5

Thought Provoking: 5/5

Solid Conclusion: 5/5

Overall: 5/5*

Homeschool Happily: Yes, You Can is Available Now on Amazon


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Published by

Yecheilyah

I write Black Historical Fiction, Poetry, and Inspirational Non-Fiction for the Freedom of all People. Visit me on the web at yecheilyahysrayl.com/

4 thoughts on “Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews – Homeschool Happily: Yes, You Can by Laura Kronen”

  1. While I agree with a lot of what you said, there are still a few things that concern me with home schooling.
    Children need others of their own age to interact with. Home schooling doesn’t give them that. Yes, they may have friends outside the family, but where do they find them? The children of family friends? That’s not giving them the experience of choosing who to be friends with.
    You might want to protect your children from the ills of life, like bullying and racism, but they will come into contact with it eventually. I think it’s better earlier, when parents and grandparents can help them deal with it in a sensible way.
    It might be fine at primary level, but secondary requires people with deep knowledge of specific subjects, and specialist equipment. Can anyone replicate a science lab at home? If you’ve never studied languages, can you teach French? Can you play team sports, so valuable for teaching co-operation.
    Finally, not every parent, even those who wish it, are not capable of teaching. Certainly not their own. I am a trained teacher and I would not have liked to teach my own children at home. In fact, my daughter was at the school where I taught and I requested not to be tometabled to teach her classes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I highly recommend you read the book because it addresses these concerns.

      The presumption in our society that “Home,” in Homeschooling means children are at home all day with little to no social interaction or that school projects can’t be replicated at home are of the many stereotypes that surround a Homeschooled Education. For me it’s not about Homeschool vs. Traditional Public/Private Schooling. Homeschool is not for everyone, and I would not recommend it for everyone. For me, it’s about understanding that a well-organized and structured Homeschool Education is not mediocre or less important in terms of a quality education than Public/Private School. Like I said, the subject and the practice are still taboo, especially here in America.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I still don’t know how the specialist expertise and specialist equipment can be done at home by ordinary mums and dads. How can a teenager of secondary school age do the scientific experiments required without access to the equipment and resources, like chemicals, microscopes, etc? How can they learn French from parents who have never studied it? How can they follow a music curriculum, which in the UK requires playing an instrument, if they aren’t musical? What about history, geography, technology, maths (many people admit to being lost with this subject) English, from people who perhaps don’t speak it grammatically themselves? And I’m not putting people down here, but I frequently hear in the UK things like ‘We have went’.

    Like

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