A.L.L. is Here!

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Copyright© A.L.L. All Rights Reserved

Today, I am proud to announce the introduction of my brother’s youth program, A.L.L. Athletic League of Leaders is a Non-Profit Youth Program based in Miami Florida dedicated to creating leaders of our young people by highlighting, through sports, a broad range of careers and skills needed to acheive their very best:

“The extremely unique non profit youth empowerment program launches its pilot today (6-17-15) at Williams Park in Overtown Miami. Over the next 7 weeks young Leaders will be exposed to over 20 sports career concepts. Teaching them the many ways they can go pro beyond the courts and fields. They will engage in hands on activities and unparalleled mentor-ship from current industry professionals. After a successful pilot we plan to launch after school programs in both Miami and Broward counties.

Upon proof of concept we plan to grow to 12 locations globally. Please spread the word and make any donations at http://www.athleticleagueofleaders.com (click on the donations tab) to help the future leaders of tomorrow.”

– Rio Infinity

“The question is not whether we can afford to invest in every child; it is whether we can afford not to.”

– Marian Wright Edelman (1939-)

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – James Earl Jones

Welcome back everyone to another Writer’s Quote Wednesday post on The PBS Blog as Hosted by Colleen of Silver Threading. As the thunder rolls and the rain floats from the sky your weekly cup of inspiration today comes from James Earl Jones:

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So of course I snagged this one from Google, but what a great quote. If not for the genius of creative written expression, there is so much of our history we would not have with us. Where would we be without books? Or the people who felt obligated enough to record their lives on paper or to think up new worlds? As a fellow book worm I don’t even wanna think about it!

About The Author:

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You don’t need an about section, of course you know James! (Right??)

 

Wikipedia:

 
James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American actor who in a career of more than 60 years has become known as “one of America’s most distinguished and versatile” actors and “one of the greatest actors in American history.” Since his Broadway debut in 1957, Jones has won many awards, including a Tony Award and Golden Globe Award for his role in The Great White Hope. Jones has won three Emmy Awards, including two in the same year in 1991, and he also earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role in the film version of The Great White Hope. He is also known for his voice acting, most notably as Darth Vader in the Star Wars film series and Mufasa in Disney’s The Lion King, as well as many other film, stage, and television roles.

 
As a child Jones had a stutter. In his episode of Biography, he said he overcame the affliction through poetry, public speaking, and acting, although it lasted for several years. A pre-med major in college, he went on to serve in the United States Army during the Korean War, before pursuing a career in acting.

 
On November 12, 2011, he received an Honorary Academy Award.

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That’s it for this week’s episode of Writer’s Quote Wednesday and as always, don’t forget to visit the links or click on the pic to see how your blog can join the fun.

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#Ronovan Writes #BeWoW Prompt – Regret

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Regret:
feel sad, repentant, or disappointed over something that has happened or been done, especially a loss or missed opportunity); a feeling of sadness, repentance, or disappointment over something that has happened or been done.

Ex. “She immediately regretted her words.”

Today, Ron’s suggested topic for #BeWoW is on Regret:

In my opinion, the idea of Regret is good. In order for someone to change from a negative situation, thought, or feeling, he or she must admit to a wrong and feel sincerely sorry for having committed this wrong. There must be some kind of sadness from having done it. This repentance of sorts then will lead to proper change in whatever capacity that it is needed. So the concept of having Regret for having done wrong is a good thing. If I have no ill will toward having done evil in the past then the reality that it is evil has not left my heart and I do not see it as the evil (or mistake) that it is. If I lied but I do not Regret lying, then I do not see it as the wrong that it is. Life presents the opportunity for change and growth in many instances in our lives. And when I look around at the negative parts of me that I struggle to completely do away with, I see those parts as belonging to a time I have not fully regretted. I know that it is bad, but I do not wholeheartedly feel bad for having participated in that bad, I have not fully Regretted it. Instead, secretly, I still see it as a good thing.

“For a seed to achieve its greatest expression, it must come completely undone. The shell cracks, its insides come out and everything changes. To someone who doesn’t understand growth, it would look like complete destruction.”

― Cynthia Occelli

On the other hand, the problem with Regret comes in when we wallow in that Regret and our repentance then turns not into positive change, but ugly depression, and thus causes us to regress in many ways. Even if I can Regret having made a mistake, I can never correct it if I continue to hold on to it. The amount of energy that I put into that kind of regret has the capacity to single handily destroy me. It leaves no room for positive change or any other feeling. This kind of Regret is a cancer, eating away at our life force until we are a mere reflection of what we used to be. It causes us to feel sorry for ourselves so deeply that we eventually hate ourselves because of it and are no longer any good; not to ourselves and not to anyone else. We fall down, but unlike positive Regret, we do not look on the fall as an opportunity to get back up, we look on it instead as a crutch and as an excuse to keep us down. This is the ugly side of regret and no good can come from it.

In closing, I say to my Regretters:

You should feel sorry when you’ve done something wrong because if not you are bound to repeat it. You should Regret it and be remorseful and sad because this is what is needed to change it from a negative to a positive situation. However, careful not to allow this sadness to turn into depression because it will destroy you. It’s OK to feel bad but eventually you gotta get yourself together and back on track. Your sanity and your growth as an individual depends on it.